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Austrailia screws your privacy

Australian government passes controversial world-first anti-encryption law amid broad criticism

The Australian government yesterday passed a controversial bill that allows law enforcement agencies to compel tech companies to hand over encrypted messaging data. The legislation has been broadly condemned by privacy groups and technology companies with suggestions it could not only harm the Australian tech industry, but undermine encryption security worldwide.

The Australian legislation has been brewing for more than a year now, with constant calls from governments around the world reiterating concerns over an inability for law enforcement agencies to access encrypted communications. The legislation, called The Assistance and Access Bill 2018, can compel a private company to create new interception capabilities so no communications data is completely inaccessible to the government. Even more controversial is the fact that this security vulnerability must be deployed in secret, without public knowledge.
     — Rich Haridy
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Closing Monument Valley

Monument Valley closed due to ‘cult activity

Monument Valley Tribal Park has closed after a group was filming without a filming permit, leading to a demonstration, according to law enforcement officials.

The group was ousted while filming for “Witness in the Desert,” a project led by Derek Broes, a “gnostic luciferian,” better known as “Global Witness.”

Broes describes his film project as a “YouTube event like any other in history.”

“Multiple channel hosts that represent more than 2 million subscribers will participate in a live event that will be broadcast live from multiple locations in the ancient locations of tribal lands in and around Monument Valley, Arizona,” he said.

The Navajo Nation’s Parks and Recreation Department authorized the closure of the park today (Nov. 29) until further notice.

“We apologize for the inconvenience this has caused for all visitors and community members,” the agency posted on its Facebook page. “Your understanding and cooperation are very much appreciated.”

Oljato Chapter President James F. Adakai told the Navajo Times that due to high level of potential threat to the health and safety of the public in the Oljato area, the chapter is seeking the assistance of law enforcement to escort Broes and his group out of tribal lands.
     — Krista Allen
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NeoNote — There is no "Judeo-Christian faith."

There is no "Judeo-Christian faith."

You're talking about disparate groups that range from Orthodox Jews to Mormons to Christian Scientists and every possible variation in between.

Their arguments among each other lead to pluralism, the American religious virtue that no one wants to talk about. No, it's always how only their particular sect is enlightened and humble enough to show the way to peace and prosperity. Which is why they think they should be "in charge." Everyone else only exists on their sufferance. Well, that's not how it has worked.

The only thing that unites them is their willingness to live and let live so long as others let them do the same. And I have news for you, they didn't get that from their holy writings.



Case in point and an overlooked example in this day and age.

For centuries, Jews were only tolerated in "Christian" nations as long as they had something the rulers wanted.

Another case in point. How many Christian monarchs waged war on each other "officially" in the name of Christianity?

Before you tell me that doesn't matter, I'll remind you of all the Bible that you routinely ignore today, including the explicit and detailed instructions on slavery.

Trade did more for pluralism and religious freedom than anything else. In fact, I just read a piece that discussed using commerce as an alternative to outrage. No matter what the flowery words, no matter what the justification, practical economics does more than religion. If you're lucky, religion and faith may point the way. But real tolerance and freedom lies in trade.

If your faith works for you and makes you a better person, more power to you. If it inspires you, great. But raising one faith above all others and demanding that everyone else submit is not freedom.



No, but that isn't the point.

I believe that the measure of a man can be found in the lives he touches. Vice or virtue is not in the label, but in the words, actions, and choices of the individual.

If you are going to claim enlightenment in the name of your faith, you'd better damn well accept the sins as well.

Recently on another site, I was discussing the actions of Christians and the American government towards the Amerindians. From the late nineteenth century after the Civil War, the American government set out to eradicate various tribes and cultures. From the 1890s to the 1930s, if was Official Policy®. Some parts didn't change until well into the 1970s (Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975), other parts didn't change until the 1990s.

The treatment of Hawaiian culture and language is another example. The push to suppress was led by Christian missionaries, something that still isn't widely acknowledged in this day and age.

I don't want to hear about the virtues of Christianity. Tell me about the good men and women who live their faith instead of spouting seldom-remembered verses from dusty books.



No, trade didn't do it all. But trade did do it better. And the great thing about it, over time trade improves things. Literally everything from technology to infrastructure to racial attitudes. Once you start making allowances for the other guy's thoughts and feelings, it's only a short step, hop, and skip to the ethic of reciprocity. The free market is still the only thing humanity has developed with a feedback loop and improvement bias built in.

I wouldn't write off China just yet. I still think that in the long run Hong Kong is going to be rightfully called The City That Ate A Country.



"Live and let live" didn't originate with Christianity and it certainly didn't originate with Judaism. More to the point (grins), Christians themselves didn't follow that idea consistently until the later half of the 20th. Even there, I have to credit trade more than faith.



Personally I prefer the original motto, E pluribus unum.

Where it originates isn't important unless you wish to establish the primacy of your faith over all others. It was Constantine's choice, to shift from one faith among many to one faith above all. The problem with making faith political is that it takes individual choice out of the equation. Faith becomes just another duty imposed by the state on it's subjects.

So for a moment, let me ask which is more important? To have "Judeo-Christianity" acknowledged as the paramount faith and The One True Way? Or just accept that how we treat each other surpasses the label?



But trade was the foundation of Greece and Rome. Trade is what turned the U.S. into a super-power.

You didn't answer the question though. Which is more important, the label or the deed? Which should be cherished?



See, this is the thing. Leaving aside the issue that not all (or even most) Jews agree with the premise "Judeo-Christian," if you claim morality and ethics set "Judeo-Christianity" apart, then you have to acknowledge all the bad and downright evil things that have been done. The Bible is not history, but history is full of terrible deeds done in the name of Christianity. I've pointed out some, such as the treatment of Amerindicans.

There's already situational ethics and multiple quagmires. Number three of the Decalogue prohibits graven images. That pretty much eliminates all crucifixes, Ten Commandment monuments, and by a strict interpretation any physical crosses entirely. And that greatest hits list puts that above honoring your parents.

Even sticking to the NT is problematical. Whole libraries have been published to deal with some of the issues. For example, if one questions if Paul is really a true apostle, doesn't that raise serious questions about his (supposed) writings? And then you have the interpretations and translations of the interpretations.

Christianity has done some magnificent things, but it has also done some draconian things. There's nothing to raise Christianity's history over a dozen other faiths except it's tolerance. And that came despite the intramural conflicts. If you look closely (and with the single exception of ending the slave trade), the good things that Christianity has done have had their roots in trade. Religion is the justification after the fact.



We do disagree. I don't think "Judeo-Christian" or "Judeo-Christianity" is a thing. If it had been Western Civilization, I probably wouldn't have said anything.



Ah, this is going to be one of those.

Yes, I picked two "extreme" versions of Christianity. I could have just as easily picked the Catholics and the Methodists. My point from the first is that there isn't a "pure" form of "Judeo-Christianity" and that label draws false equivalences between sects that have very little to do with each other.

Even if you eliminate the Essenes, sectarianism predates the "historical Jesus." There is no one thread that links Judaism and Christianity. Christianity picks and chooses which parts of Judaism it uses and leaves the rest in the trash bin. From the very beginning, Christianity has also been marked by sectarianism. Christian rulers have also ruthlessly suppressed the sects they could not control.

But let's return to the assumption that Christianity is THE successor to Judaism and is therefore entitled to proclaim what is true.

For our purposes here, there are three significant differences between Christianity and Judaism. First are the textual differences. There are books in the Torah that are not part of Christian canon, and of course the entire New Testament (any version) is not found in Jewish law. Second is the Christian assertion of Jesus as the Messiah (leaving aside the question of if he existed). And finally the Christian announcement there is a new covenant that replaces Jews as G*D's chosen people.

Taken together, these differences reduce Judaism from a living faith to a curious relic that exists only because Christians sometimes find it interesting. Why in the World would devout Jews be part of that?

Of course there are many more differences than those I listed. But the underlying assumption of "Judeo-Christian" thought is that men and women have moved on from Judaism because it is less important than Christianity. "Judeo-Christianity" claims to honor Judaism all while diminishing it's contributions. "Judeo-Christianity" is a one-sided exchange that treats Judaism as a second class source, occasionally tolerated but seldom valued on it's own merits.
NeoNotes are the selected comments that I made on other boards, in email, or in response to articles where I could not respond directly.

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Sunday bonus roundup

Headlines that don't merit their own entry


When Nonviolence Isn't Enough



THREE whistleblowers hand over hundreds of documents 'showing the Clinton Foundation misused funds and made quid-pro-quo promises to donors about access to Hillary'



Feds received whistleblower evidence in 2017 alleging Clinton Foundation wrongdoing



Judge Calls Clinton Emails One Of 'Gravest Modern Offenses To Government Transparency,' Orders Further Fact-Finding



Climate Hoax: Global CO2 Emissions Spike, Despite Paris Climate Pledges



Perversion of Justice

A decade before #MeToo, a multimillionaire sex offender from Florida got the ultimate break.

France's Gas Tax Disaster Shows We Can't Save Earth by Screwing Over Poor People



China: Executives Disappear or Get Arrested One by One


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Friday roundup

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Thursday oversized roundup

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Wednesday roundup

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“Stossel: Google and Facebook Cross "The Creepy Line"”

“Tech companies are compiling incredibly detailed dossiers about you.”

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Tuesday roundup

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Monday roundup

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Bonus Sunday roundup

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Choosing the most oppressed

Progressive politics revolves around choosing the most oppressed so that everyone else can be shamed into granting extra privileges to the designated victims.
— from the private journal of NeoWayland
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Wednesday mini-roundup

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NeoNote — George Soros and anti-Semitism

I still say that George Soros is just a secret lair away from super-villian territory.

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Tuesday mini-roundup

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Monday mini-roundup

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from crux № 5 - making mistakes

Freedom means making mistakes and learning to deal with the consequences

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Friday mini-roundup

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“Proclamation of Thanksgiving”

“Sarah Josepha Hale, a 74-year-old magazine editor, wrote a letter to Lincoln on September 28, 1863, urging him to have the "day of our annual Thanksgiving made a National and fixed Union Festival." She explained, "You may have observed that, for some years past, there has been an increasing interest felt in our land to have the Thanksgiving held on the same day, in all the States; it now needs National recognition and authoritive fixation, only, to become permanently, an American custom and institution."

Prior to this, each state scheduled its own Thanksgiving holiday at different times, mainly in New England and other Northern states. President Lincoln responded to Mrs. Hale's request immediately, unlike several of his predecessors, who ignored her petitions altogether. In her letter to Lincoln she mentioned that she had been advocating a national thanksgiving date for 15 years as the editor of Godey's Lady's Book. George Washington was the first president to proclaim a day of thanksgiving, issuing his request on October 3, 1789, exactly 74 years before Lincoln's.”

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Thusday roundup

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❝All religions are not equal…❞

All religions are not equal, not because of their doctrine or sacred writings but because individuals chose to make it better. For example, for centuries the Bible was literally considered the how-to guide for making slavery practical. And not just among Christians.

The writings didn't change.

As a libertarian, I oppose government sponsored foreign aid. For what it's worth, I oppose government sponsored domestic aid for obvious reasons.
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Wednesday roundup

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NeoNote — Someone made the choice for you

Someone else decided that obviously you couldn't be trusted to make the Proper Choice.

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“Victoria's Secret: NO Trans Models!”

“The 2018 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show has been criticized by diversity advocates for not including any trans, plus-sized, or disabled models. Then, a transgender woman's cycling championship sparks the question of transgender athletes in sports competitions once again.”

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Tuesday roundup

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NeoNote — Nature and the World are not cruel.

So does that mean that the Decalogue has no value?

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“Remy: The Legend of Stan Lee”

“Remy recalls a time when experts were claiming "Hitler was a beginner compared to the comic-book industry," and how Stan Lee took a stand.”

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❝I can't be responsible for them…❞

Christianity, the Nation of Islam, atheism, Paganism, these are labels. Now people may use those labels as justifications for their actions, but it is not the label that is responsible. As a Pagan I'm not responsible for the actions of every Pagan out there. I'm responsible for my actions. Since I believe strongly that the measure of a man is in the lives he touches, I'll even accept some of the responsibility for the actions of the people I know and love. But someone I've never met? I can't be responsible for them, no matter what the label they choose. The label isn't responsible, the individuals are.
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Anonymous 'Santa Claus'

“Who can afford to pay for everyone’s layaway?”

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Missing wallet

“Man Is Captured On Security Cam Returning Woman's Missing Wallet”

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Shares the wealth

“Powerball winner, a single mom, shares her wealth with wounded veterans”

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Revoke

“Trump everyone's hard passes then”

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Supersized Monday roundup

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NeoNote — The Democrats aren't democratic

When they have eliminated superdelegates, they will have earned the designation.

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Friday roundup

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Batkid in remission

Batkid saved San Francisco five years ago, and his cancer's been in remission ever since

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Defining a libertarian

The Merriam=Webster Online dictionary defines Libertarian as: “a person who upholds the principles of individual liberty especially of thought and action.”  I agree with that definition.  The same dictionary defines liberty as:” the power to do as one pleases.”  This definition I do not agree with because it is incomplete.  It differs from the definition that was universally accepted by those who wrote and ratified the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  They believed that liberty is the freedom to do as you please, as long as you do not hurt others, or interfere with the rights of others.  It is freedom with the responsibility to not hurt others or prevent them from exercising their rights.

A Libertarian believes that preventing individuals from harming others, or interfering with the rights of others, are the only legitimate functions of government.  They believe that individuals should be free to live their lives as they choose, free from any government interference, as long as they treat others properly.  They believe that government assistance, of any kind, is unacceptable, unneeded, and harmful.

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Sewage into energy

Special Bacteria is Found to be a ‘Battery’ That Turns Sewage Waste into Clean Hydrogen Energy

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Homegrown Philanthropy

Africa’s ‘Homegrown Philanthropy’ is Rising, Creating Self-Sufficiency for a New Generation

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